Videos

Man playing on his flute on the trail from Dharamshala to Triund. Himachal Pradesh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Buddhist monks have a lively debate on spiritual topics. Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
A Rajasthani couple render a folk song to an uninterested audience at the market place. Chamba, Himachal Pradesh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
A few men of a nomadic tribe come down from the hills with butter and other milk produce for the market. Bhadarwah, Jammu & Kashmir.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Tea pickers start the day early on the green undulating slopes of an estate. Mirik, West Bengal.

 
 
 
 
 
 
A typical day at the temple with the faithful coming to turn to Wheel of Dharma for the good of all beings. Leh, Jammu & Kashmir.

 
 
 
 
 
 
A man colours a dupatta in one of many narrow lanes of old town. Leh, Jammu & Kashmir.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Just before the festival of Uttarayan, workers prepare for the busy season of kite flying. These threads coated with a paste of powdered glass will give cutting-edge competition. Ahmedabad, Gujarat.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Frogs are eaten commonly by locals. Here children are seen catching them along the banks of a river. Sometimes they dash the frogs to the rocks before bottling them up for dinner. Dhirang, Arunachal Pradesh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Traditional weaving of Chamba shawls at a workshop. Chamba, Himachal Pradesh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Children dance on the streets on the evening of Krishna Janmastami to celebrate the birth of Lord Krishna. This dance is called kolattam. Thrissur, Kerala.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Old fishing nets of this type survive in Fort Kochi. It takes 4 to 6 men to operate one of these. Fort Kochi, Kerala.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Betting, bleeding and death are all part of the show at a traditional cock-fight held one evening outside Jagdalpur. Sargipal, Chhattisgarh.

 
 
 
 
 
 
For the budget traveller, public boats run by Kerala State Transport Corporation are the best means to enjoy these backwaters. Alleppey, Kerala.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Fishermen swivelling the boat out to sea. Kovalam, Kerala.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Pilgrims prostrate before the main temple while others meditate. Bodh Gaya, Bihar.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Traditionally royal welcomes were done with music played from the Naubhat Khana. Such drumming was also performed at fixed times during the day. Here two musicians recreate the ambience for the benefit of tourists to the palace. Amber, Rajasthan.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Village women spin yarn from sheep wool. Woollens are hand-knitted and sold to tourists who pass this way on their pilgrimage to Gangotri. Harsil, Uttarakhand.

 
 
 
 
 
 
With cowrie shells and a couple of dice, village men while away their late afternoons. A few rupees in coins adds interest to the game. Harsil, Uttarakhand.

 
 
 
 
 
 
These durries are woven by hand at a workshop. They are usually made by commission and most are exported to international markets. Panipat, Haryana.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Saplings are brought from nurseries and planted by workers in neat lines. Nature does the rest in this beautiful rural landscape. Syntu Ksiar, Meghalaya.

 
 
 
 
 
 
What do you do when your passenger train from Tatanagar to Ranchi stops between stations for a couple of hours? Listen to local performers and enjoy traditional folk music. Jharkhand.

 
 
 
 
 
 
At a roadshow, a Naga tribe performs its traditional dance. Their shields are laid out on the ground.

 
 
 
 
 
 
The people of North Eastern India have a rich traditional of weaving. Often verandahs in front of houses have a loom. This woman weaves a shawl to be worn by men. She uses what is called the back tension loom. Kohima, Nagaland.

 
 
 
 
 
 
What is done by machines in the West is still a cottage industry in India. Fishermen weave their nets before going out to sea. Fishing is a community occupation in most parts of India. Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu.

Responses

  1. it is a wonderful journey capturing rural india and green living
    pl send to bill gates milinda foundation

    also put it in face book
    one video perweek
    krishnan
    indiranagar bangalore

  2. Hey
    I’m trying to find author for this blog but there aint anyway to specificly contact

    But i hope this will help
    If you are the author of this blog please mail me at the email address i used to post this comment

    thanks!!


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